Response to Basin States’ Lake Powell Pipeline letter

Image of Lake Powell at Twillight
Image of Lake Powell at Twillight

Response to Basin States’ Lake Powell Pipeline letter

Published 09-09-20

The Sept. 8 conclusion of the public comment period for the Lake Powell Pipeline draft Environmental Impact Statement is another significant project milestone. We’re pleased to know the other Colorado River Basin States are committed to working toward solutions in good faith. 

Comments from the other basin states were expected and are part of a comprehensive process. There are numerous water projects in the West that have worked through unresolved issues while under federal review. As basin states, we have a history of solving complex challenges, and we will do so now. 

The State of Utah remains committed to working with the other basin states to mitigate their concerns raised by our intent to use a portion of Utah’s Colorado River allocation to provide water to Washington County. We will work diligently to address their concerns over the coming months. 

The current NEPA process is the culmination of 20 years of study and planning. The project would use 5% of Utah’s Colorado River compact allocation and is critical to meeting the needs of southern Utah by enhancing the reliability of Washington County’s water system. Without the project, the economic viability and water security of one of the fastest-growing regions in the United States will be harmed.  – Utah Division of Water Resources Director Todd Adams

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