Weekly lawn watering guide moves to new site

Published 05-07-21

The Utah Division of Water Resources has launched a new water conservation website. Our popular weekly lawn watering guide can be found from the main menu of the new site and now lives on this page: https://conservewater.utah.gov/weekly-lawn-watering-guide/

If you’ve been automatically linking to the old site, please update your link. We have temporarily created some redirects to help ensure your current links are not broken, but you will want to be sure you are pointing directly to our current page and/or embedded image. If you haven’t been linking to it, we invite you to consider it! It’s a great tool that, if followed, will help stretch the water supply. 

About the Guide 
Did you know that eliminating one watering saves about 3,000 gallons for the average quarter-acre yard! To customize watering for your area, the Division of Water Resources publishes a Weekly Lawn Watering Guide on our Facebook page and online that recommends watering based on weather patterns and evapotranspiration rates in each county. The guide takes extensive data and simplifies it into how many days to water each week. (Microclimates may require adjustments to your watering schedule.)

With all of the state in drought, watering efficiently is more critical than ever. Follow the guide to save water – and money – and avoid the problems that can accompany overwatering like pests and disease. We estimate that Utah could save more than 20 billion gallons of water every summer if everyone were to water according to the guide! Also, make sure your sprinklers are property adjusted to water plants, not pavement. Do your part to Slow The Flow.

Using water wisely is always recommended, but with 100% of the state experiencing drought, it’s critical. Thank you for helping raise awareness of this precious resource! 

Gov. Cox orders water conservation at state facilities

Published 05-03-21

In response to ongoing concerns about extremely dry conditions, Gov. Spencer J. Cox issued an executive order forbidding irrigation at state facilities between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., requiring that sprinklers are shut off during rain storms and making sure landscape watering systems are operating efficiently.

Executive Order 2021-10 also encourages local governments to implement similar water restrictions on public landscaping, urges irrigation companies to delay the start of the irrigation season and asks all Utahns to reduce water use by taking shorter showers, converting turf to waterwise landscaping and replacing appliances with water-efficient models.

“Last year, Utah experienced one of the driest and hottest years on record and we anticipate another tough drought year ahead,” Gov. Cox said. “State government is committed to doing its part to conserve water and we encourage all Utahns to use this most precious resource wisely and sparingly.”

Executive Order 2021-10 is effective immediately

Gov. Cox issues drought executive order

Published 03-17-21

With 100% in the moderate drought category and 90% of the state experiencing extreme drought, today Gov. Spencer J. Cox issued an Executive Order declaring a state of emergency due to drought conditions. This declaration allows drought-affected communities, agricultural producers and others to officially begin the process that may provide access to state or federal emergency resources.

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Bear Lake could store additional water if operations changed

Published 12-22-20

Can more water be stored in Bear Lake by adjusting flood control operations? Idaho, Utah and PacifiCorp worked with reservoir modeling experts at the University of Colorado to answer this question. The technical report “Impacts on Bear Lake Storage under Alternative High-Runoff Management Operations” published today, summarizes findings about how different flood control operations can raise lake levels and increase storage.

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Latest water use numbers posted to revamped Open Water Data website

Published 12-21-20

The state’s latest water use numbers have been published by the Utah Division of Water Resources and can be found on the recently overhauled and upgraded Open Water Data website. 

The latest municipal and industrial (M&I) numbers are from 2019 and show that statewide per capita water use for potable and secondary water is 223 gallons per capita per day (GPCD).  In 2018, the total GPCD was 241 (2017 – 244 and 2016 – 245). M&I includes residential, commercial, institutional (for example, schools and parks), and industrial water use.

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Great Salt Lake image

Conservation critical to meet Utah’s water needs

Published 10-22-20

Conservation is critical to meet the water needs of Utah’s growing population and is a factor that can significantly postpone water development projects. 

“We’ve seen how implementing water conservation strategies can delay large-scale infrastructure projects,” said Todd Adams, director of the Utah Division of Water Resources. “When the Legislature passed the Bear River Development Act in 1991, the projected need for the water was in 2015. Thanks primarily to conservation efforts, new technology and some smaller water development projects, current projections indicate the water won’t be needed until 2045 to 2050.” 

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Extension requested on Lake Powell Pipeline timeline

Published 09-24-20

The Utah Division of Water Resources and Washington County Water Conservancy District have requested an extended timeline from the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) to consider comments received on the Lake Powell Pipeline’s draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) from the public, tribes, non-government organizations and fellow Colorado River Basin states.

“The Lake Powell Pipeline is a critical water infrastructure project for Utah,” said Todd Adams, director, Utah Division of Water Resources. “The extension will allow more time to consider the comments and complete further analysis, which will contribute to a more comprehensive draft and final EIS.”

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Changes Coming to Smart Controller Rebate

Changes coming to smart irrigation controller rebate program

Published 09-15-20

Changes are coming to the Utah Division of Water Resources’ smart irrigation controller rebate program. The current program rebates 50% of the cost (up to $150) when you purchase an eligible WaterSense labeled smart controller. The program is transitioning to a fixed rebate of up to $75 beginning Nov. 1.

“Smart controller costs have come down since the program’s inception in 2018. Now you can get a great controller starting as low as $59,” said Marcie Larson, the division’s manager over water conservation and public information. “Currently the average rebate is about $66, so the new fixed-rate program that gives consumers up to $75 is a great deal and also allows more rebates to be awarded. The current rebate works well for those who want to purchase a more expensive controller.” 

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Image of Lake Powell at Twillight

Response to Basin States’ Lake Powell Pipeline letter

Published 09-09-20

The Sept. 8 conclusion of the public comment period for the Lake Powell Pipeline draft Environmental Impact Statement is another significant project milestone. We’re pleased to know the other Colorado River Basin States are committed to working toward solutions in good faith. 

Comments from the other basin states were expected and are part of a comprehensive process. There are numerous water projects in the West that have worked through unresolved issues while under federal review. As basin states, we have a history of solving complex challenges, and we will do so now. 

The State of Utah remains committed to working with the other basin states to mitigate their concerns raised by our intent to use a portion of Utah’s Colorado River allocation to provide water to Washington County. We will work diligently to address their concerns over the coming months. 

The current NEPA process is the culmination of 20 years of study and planning. The project would use 5% of Utah’s Colorado River compact allocation and is critical to meeting the needs of southern Utah by enhancing the reliability of Washington County’s water system. Without the project, the economic viability and water security of one of the fastest-growing regions in the United States will be harmed.  – Utah Division of Water Resources Director Todd Adams

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