Communities Across the State Converting Over 120,000 sq. ft of Thirsty Grass to Drought-Resistant Landscapes

Image of Utah Division Of Water Resources logo and Flip Blitz logo
Image of Utah Division Of Water Resources logo and Flip Blitz logo

Communities Across the State Converting Over 120,000 sq. ft of Thirsty Grass to Drought-Resistant Landscapes

Published 05-18-22

The Utah Division of Water Resources, water districts, municipalities and one university will convert 120,441 sq. ft of grassy park strips and other landscapes to waterwise landscapes on May 19. This is the second “Flip Blitz,” a campaign that aims to raise awareness about how small landscape changes can make a big difference. Over 85% of the conversions will take place in Washington County alone.

More than 20 landscape conversion projects are planned throughout the state, including: 

  • 34,000 sq. ft converted at Gubler Park, Santa Clara (Washington County) 
    • no formal press conference, media are welcome to visit FlipBlitz sites at their convenience. Please reach out to Karry Rathje at karry@wcwcd.org to organize interviews.
  • 328 sq. ft converted at 6637 W. Bull River Rd. (Utah County press conference location)  9 a.m.
  • 5256 sq. ft converted at Price City Fire Department (Price/USU press conference location) 10 a.m.
  • 7000 sq. ft converted at 4400 S between 275 and 300 West, Washington Terrace City
    • no formal press conference, media are welcome to visit FlipBlitz sites at their convenience. Please reach out to John Parry at jparry@weberbasin.com to organize interviews.

Park strips and other grassy areas can be hard to water efficiently, and often result in wet sidewalks and wasted water. Gov. Spencer Cox identified landscape diversification as one of his four key water conservation measures, and Flip Blitz is in line with that guidance. 

“Utah is becoming more drought resilient,” Utah Division of Water Resources Director Candice Hasenyager said. “This second round of Flip Blitz demonstrates Utah’s statewide level of collaboration and commitment to further advance water conservation initiatives.”

The first Flip Blitz transformed four residential properties in September 2021. The campaign is now widening its reach to multiple locations across the state and different properties such as parks and USU Eastern campus. 

“We have three conservancy districts, eight residential properties, 11 cities, one NGO, and three businesses as partners this year,” said Josh Zimmerman, Utah Division of Water Resources Water Conservation Coordinator. “Our community partners understand that by converting their park strips to a waterwise design they can improve their curb appeal while saving huge amounts of water, and we’re excited about the opportunity to raise awareness about it.”

This program relied heavily on volunteers to administer it. Those volunteer experts include:

  • Bonneville Environmental Group
  • META
  • GovFriend
  • Wards Landscape and Garden Center
  • Ryan Davis with Western Roots Wholesale
  • Brandon Miller with Ikon Landscaping
  • Central Utah Water Conservancy District
  • Weber Basin Water Conservancy District
  • Washington County Water Conservancy District
  • Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District
  • St. George City
  • Santa Clara City
  • Washington City
  • Hurricane City
  • Ivins City
  • Toquerville City
  • Clearfield City
  • Washington Terrace City
  • Layton City
  • Price City
  • Utah State University Eastern Campus
  • Utah State University Prehistoric Museum
  • localscapes.com 
  • utahwatersavers.com

Full List of Flip Blitz Locations:

  • Utah County (2,190 sq. ft)
    • 6337 Bull River Road, Highland, Utah 84003
      • 328 sq ft (front) 32 sq ft (mailbox)
    • 2696 W 570 N, Provo, UT 84601325 sq. ft
    • 112 W 900 S. Santaquin, UT 84655
      • 283 sq. ft
    • 354 E 100 S, Provo, UT 84606
      • 357 sq. ft
    • 1685 W 800 S, Lehi, UT 84043
      • 373 sq. ft
    • 961 W 550 S, Orem, UT 84058
      • 337 sq. ft
    • 4479 East Pine Hollow Drive, Eagle Mountain, UT 84005
      • 155 sq. ft
  • Washington County (102,667 sq. ft)
    • Gubler Park, Santa Clara
      • 34,000 sq. ft 
    • Sunbrook HOA, St George
      • 43,000 sq. ft 
    • Cemetery, Washington City
      • 7,000 sq. ft 
    • Nisson Park, Washington City
      • 12,000 sq. ft 
    • City Office, Hurricane
      • 1,000 sq. ft 
    • Utility Park, Ivins
      • 4,225 sq. ft 
    • City Hall, Toquerville
      • 1,000 sq. ft
    • Washington County Water Conservancy District, St. George
      • 442 sq. ft
  • Price/USU (total: 11,256)
    • Price USU Eastern
      • 6,000 sq. ft 
    • Price City Fire Dept/museum
      • 5,256 sq. ft
  • Weber and Davis Counties (total: 9280 sq. ft)
    • 300 N 1000 W, Clearfield City
      • 1,600 sq. ft
    • 1890 N Fort Ln, Layton
      • 680 sq. ft  with another 700 possible
    • 4400 S between 275 and 300 West, Washington Terrace City
      • 7000 sq. ft on a city property
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