New “Drought Watering Guide” replaces traditional guide

New “Drought Watering Guide” replaces traditional guide

Published 06-11-21

Extreme drought continues to plague the state, so the Utah Division of Water Resources has replaced its traditional lawn watering guide with an “Extreme Drought Watering Guide” to reflect drought actions. The “Drought Watering Guide” replaces the popular Weekly Lawn Watering Guide (we hope temporarily) and focuses on “survival watering.” While extreme drought conditions exist, the guide will focus on minimal watering to keep grass alive: two times a week in northern Utah and three times a week in southern Utah. 

With 60% of residential water use applied to outdoor landscapes, Utahns are asked to look for ways to reduce their use. Eliminating just one watering can save about 3,000 gallons for the average quarter-acre Utah yard. More drought actions and water-saving tips can be found at slowtheflow.org 

Using water efficiently is always the best practice and saves money. But during extreme drought, it’s critical to help stretch the water supply. 

Published July 29, 2021

At a press conference today, Gov. Spencer Cox was joined by water districts and St. George Mayor Michele Randall to highlight water-saving efforts underway around the state and announce conservation program expansions. Although drought conditions are discouraging, many Utahns are taking water-saving actions at their homes, businesses, communities, and industries. Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District …

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Published July 24, 2021

According to the USGS, the southern portion of the Great Salt Lake is at a new historic low, with average daily water levels dropping about an inch below the previous record set in 1963, according to U.S. Geological Survey information collected at the SaltAir gauge location.   “Based on current trends and historical data, the USGS anticipates water levels may decline an additional foot over …

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Published July 3, 2021

Reports that the Great Salt Lake has dropped below its historic low elevation of 4,191.35 are premature. The Utah Division of Water Resources is following the lake’s elevation closely and expects it will drop below that point in the coming days. Conditions like wind, inflow and evaporation can cause the lake’s elevation to fluctuate. Sometimes …

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