Lake Powell Pipeline Draft EIS Issued

Lake Powell Pipeline Draft EIS Issued

Published 06-09-20

St. George, UT – After decades of study, the Lake Powell Pipeline has reached a critical milestone – the Bureau of Reclamation has issued the draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and opened a public comment period. The Southern Alternative has been named the “preferred alternative.”

LPP will deliver up to 86,249 acre feet of water through a 140-mile underground pipeline to Washington County. The draft EIS studied the need, purpose and socioeconomic impacts and other important considerations for the project. It also outlined how the project can be built in a manner that protects the environment.

Some of the key findings are:
• Washington County needs more water.
• Washington County needs a second source of water.
• The project is the only alternative that meets Washington County’s water need.
• Conservation alone will not meet Washington County’s future water demand.
• The project is affordable and Washington County has the ability to repay the state of Utah to build the project.
• The project uses only a portion of Utah’s existing Colorado River water right.
• Short-term construction-related expenditures will produce more than $1.7 billion in total economic output and create more than 11,000 jobs for Utahns.
• The long-term benefit of a reliable water supply is worth over $2 billion.
• The project will benefit endangered fish and birds because it allows water to flow from the Green River to Lake Powell, benefiting Colorado River fish and designated critical habitat.
• The project will have minimal impacts to the landscape. Land disturbances will be short term and effects will be controlled through environmental protection measures that will avoid or minimize impacts.
• The project’s proposed environmental protection measures would be highly effective in minimizing temporary effects to plants and animals during construction.

Public comment is being accepted now through Sept. 8. Comments must be provided to Reclamation in writing via email, fax or regular mail. A link for directions on how to submit comments is found at LPPUtah.org.

“We appreciate the amount of work that has gone into this exhaustive review of the Lake Powell Pipeline,” said Todd Adams, director of the Utah Division of Water Resources. “This is a major step forward for this project that’s so important to our state. We encourage the public to review the studies and learn more.”

“Nothing is more important than ensuring our communities have a reliable water supply today and in the future,” said Zach Renstrom, general manager of the Washington County Water Conservancy District. “It’s important to make your voice heard on this critical project.”
Visit LPPUtah.org to learn more.

For more information, contact:

Kim Wells, Division of Water Resources PIO
801.803.0336

Karry Rathje, LPP Communications Director
435.668.5622

Summary of Key Findings

Published September 29, 2021

SALT LAKE CITY (Sept. 29, 2021) – The Utah Division of Water Resources is seeking public input on the new Water Resources Plan. This plan is the result of years of data gathering, modeling and other collaborative efforts to identify when and where water will be needed throughout the state. The comment period runs Sept. …

Read Full Article
Published September 21, 2021

SALT LAKE CITY (Sept. 20, 2021) – The Utah Division of Water Resources will convert four grassy park strips to lush but water-wise landscapes to launch “Flip Blitz,” a campaign that aims to raise awareness about how small landscape changes can make a big difference. The campaign kicks off Tuesday, Sept. 21 at 13218 S …

Read Full Article
Published August 26, 2021

SALT LAKE CITY – Candice Hasenyager has been named director of the Utah Division of Water Resources. Hasenyager replaces Todd Adams who was appointed this week as deputy director for the Department of Natural Resources. Adams fills a vacancy created by Rory Reynolds who is retiring after 31 years with DNR.  “Candice is a natural …

Read Full Article